Bass Trombone

I'm trying to figure out how to play bass trombone.
I'm sure most alternatives wont be used!
Having learnt tenor trombone in the brass band world I was taught how to read treble clef for B♭ instruments. The switch to bass clef concert pitch is messing with my head a little but I'm trying to come up with exercises that will help me both figure out what to play where and also the massive amount of alternative positions that come up (especially if you have independent valves) I've read that lots of people don't use the G♭ by itself but I was given an independent trombone so I figure the only reason it's independent is so you can use it by itself! I'll upload bits I've done in the hope it will help others making the switch.
Here's my first stab at what the positions are, anyone is welcome to use this (and contact me if they find errors!)There are 5 pages,each page essentially contains the same information in but in a slightly different format. I've deliberately left out notes with an obscene amount of ledger lines - I'll deal with the very low and very high ends when I've figured out the bits I'm most likely to be playing! (the crotchet rests on page 1 can be swapped for the note an octave below the note after the rest - like in the 1st bar - for those keen on sorting the low range)
p1 - click for full size image
p2 - click for full size image
p3 - click for full size image
p4 - click for full size image
p5 - click for full size image
pdf of all 5 pagespdf of all 5 pages (73.8k bytes)

Some slide positions charts refer to the triggerd positions in terms of semitones down from 1st. While I can see the logic it's important to know the physical position on the slide. I prefer Alan Raph's method of positioning relative to the 'regular' un-triggered positions. So instead of TT4 (double trigger 4th position)I have written fg♭5 i.e. you want to aim for a flat(long) 5th position to hit the correct spot.
Bass Trombone
I'm trying to figure out how to play bass trombone.
I'm sure most alternatives wont be used!